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in the morning, and at the end of the day, they're dead. >> with them, street to stree, as they fight assad's army. >> we are returning now, after the attack. it just shows you how brave they are, and at the same time, how disorganized they are. >> guardicorrespondent for frontlinghaith abdul-ahad, takes you inside the battle for syria. and later tonight, the regime responds. >> the regime now is bombarding civilian neighborhoods with artillery, with tank fire, and with fighter bombers. >> how is president bashar al-assad holding on to power? >> the iranians are gaining influence in syria now by the day. >> and what will happen if asd falls? >> there is definitely increasing worry in the united states administration about in whose hands these weapons are falling. >> these two stories on this special edition frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. majofundinis provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and
committee. >> you have this-- this horrible possibility that if assad falls and there is a huge vacuum and cass on ensues, that you have hezbollah there, you have al qaeda, you have some hamas elements there, and you have lots of chemical weapons and lots of very sophisticated conventional weapons that will be up for grabs. and that chaos will cause huge problem for the middle east, for southern europe, and i argue, for the unit stat. member,hese are sophisticated weapons system would make libya look like an antique gun show when all of those weapons spread across north africa. dangerous, destabilizing stuff. >> rose: we continue with a an analysis from richard haas of council on foreign relations, and joshua landis of the university of oklahoma. >> desperate leaders might do desperate things if they felt there was no alternative. i don'i don't think we can prevent the use unless we thaten, i if they are used on any significant scale, what do we do then? >> rose: we conclude with a look at the press conference pie the chairman of the federal reserve, ben bernanke. my guests alan blinde
in just the. >> what is going to happen? >> ultimately bashar assad will fall. the timing the precise scenario are not known. but the rebels are encroaching. they control more ter another-- territory. they have half of aleppo. they are fighting in the outskirts of damascus am we can see the regime becomes more desperate with its back to the world, may or may not have used chemical weapons. but the calculus is the calculus of desperate -- >> may or may not have used chemical weapons. certainly not in an extent that might be powerful and that might change as the president said, be a game changer. they haven't used him that way. >> right. >> do you believe they would use them that way? that is not-- it's not they. the people bashar assad and those that are supporting him believe that that is the only thing they have left. >> they have made so many mistakes in the past two years that i can't really doubt. it would be a terrible act and a terrible mistake but i can't rule it out. >> rose: i think that they're testing obama. they are testing this red line that obama has put down. they have
to syria, which they're doing on virtually a daily basis now in support of basharof al-assad, which was an inadvertent consequence.an but it stems from the fact that no forces were there to govern iraqi airspace.go second, if we had had even just 1,000 special forces there,st special operations forces to work with the iraqis special operations forces we would have been much more effective against al qaeda in iraq, which is largely defeated during the surge, but not epityler. al qaeda in iraq is now morphed into the anasra front, the primary jihadi organization in syria that is causing us so much heartburn. >> rose: okay, we want to talkch about that when we continue with this segment and some other people who have written about and were reporters there, including john burns, and fouad ajami, dexter filkins, to talk about the implications also in this book-- and michael will stay with us-- having to do witl how do you measure the iraqi war after 10 years, 4,500 american lives, some 30,000 came home injured, $2 trillion, i think, is the number they put on it, correct? >> you can calcu
>> sreenivasan: president bashar assad is widely believed to have a chemical weapons arsenal, including nerve agents as well as mustard gas. the parliament of cyprus voted to reject a bill that would tax bank deposits in order to qualify for an international bailout package. to receive $13 billion from the e.u. and the international monetary fund, cyprus has to raise $7.5 billion on its own. but taxing people's bank accounts proved unpopular, even when the provision was added to shield small savers. banks across cyprus will remain closed until thursday to avoid a run on cash. uncertainty about the cyprus situation set markets around the world and on wall street on edge. the dow jones industrial average gained more than three points to close above 14,455. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3229. seven u.s. marines were killed after a mortar unexpectedly exploded during a training exercise in western nevada. military officials said that prompted the pentagon to halt the use of the mortar worldwide until an investigation can be completed. the accident happened last night at the hawthorne a
. at least 42 people were killed, among them a top sunni muslim cleric who supported president bashar assad. iran appeared today to open the door to possible direct talks with the u.s. over its nuclear program. the supreme ayatollah ali khamenei said he is not opposed to talks, but he also said he is not optimistic they'd accomplish much. he also repeated iran's claim that its nuclear programs are for peaceful purposes. a car bomb killed 13 people waiting in line for food at a refugee camp in pakistan today. hundreds were lined up for food rations at the jalozai camp in northwest pakistan when the bomb went off. an aid worker and a security guard were among those killed. 25 others were injured. many of the refugees at the camp have been displaced by fighting along the afghan border between the pakistani army and the taliban. a jailed kurdish leader in turkey called for an immediate truce today in one of the world's longest and bloodiest insurgencies. a huge crowd of kurds danced and cheered as abdullah ocalan's letter directing his forces to withdraw from turkey was read aloud. his worker'
arab leader to call on bashar al- assad to go, and is cooperating with the u.s. and others to make that happen. jordan reportedly hosts u.s. and other special forces training the ragtag syrian rebels. but the pressures come from a flood of syrian refugees. some 460,000 now, housed in squalid refugee camps, and the numbers keep growing. >> how are you going to turn back women, children and the wounded? this is something that we just can't do. it's not the jordanian way. the problem is obviously the burden it's having on jordan. we've tried to quantify it as much as possible. the latest figure says it's going to cost roughly $550 million a year. not only is that a problem, but it's going to be a tremendous strain, obviously, on infrastructure, and it's creating social problems and security problems. >> warner: there are strains on jordan too from the fact an estimated half of all jordanians are palestinians from the west bank. so king abdullah has long urged the u.s. to get re-engaged in trying to bring peace between israelis and palestinians. the president said he was ready to do wh
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)